Microinverters

A popular choice for safety, efficiency, and flexibility

Solar inverters have one core function: to convert the Direct Current (DC) solar panels generate into an Alternating Current (AC), which is the type of electricity used in your home. 

Many solar energy systems use “string” inverters, so-called because all the panels are linked to one inverter, which is a standalone box typically installed close to your main service panel and meter board.

Microinverters perform the same basic function as string inverters, but instead of having one or two for the entire installation, there is one for every solar panel on your roof. Microinverters are installed beneath each panel and convert the DC current to AC before it leaves the roof.

Microinverters cost a little more than string inverters, but they last longer and offer benefits in terms of safety, efficiency, and flexibility.

Safe

Microinverters convert the DC current to AC on the roof, which means there is no high-voltage DC working its way across your roof to connect to a central inverter. This not only reduces the potential for a fault to spark a fire, it’s also safer for anyone who needs to be on the roof for any reason.

Efficient

All solar panels get obstructed from time to time by leaves, dirt, and clouds. With microinverters, only individual panels are affected, while the unobstructed panels keep performing to their fullest.

A string inverter system is only as good as its lowest-performing panel. If shade or a pile of leaves reduces one panel's output, every other panel will work at the same reduced capacity.

This makes microinverters particularly good for roofs that are shaded for part of the day and ensures you get more solar power and greater energy savings from the same panels.

Flexible 

If you need to expand your system in the future, microinverters are simple to add to your existing solar array one at a time.

To get optimal performance from a string inverter, it needs to be working near its peak capacity. So, if you want to increase the size of your solar array at some point, those panels will need to be routed to a separate string inverter, adding extra complexity and cost.

But wait, there’s more

If something goes wrong with your microinverters, such as an obstruction, crack, or fault, smart monitoring lets us pinpoint the issue instantly, and often resolve it, remotely. If not, we’ll at least arrive at your place knowing exactly what to look for.

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A popular choice for safety, efficiency, and flexibility

Solar inverters have one core function: to convert the Direct Current (DC) solar panels generate into an Alternating Current (AC), which is the type of electricity used in your home. 

Many solar energy systems use “string” inverters, so-called because all the panels are linked to one inverter, which is a standalone box typically installed close to your main service panel and meter board.

Microinverters perform the same basic function as string inverters, but instead of having one or two for the entire installation, there is one for every solar panel on your roof. Microinverters are installed beneath each panel and convert the DC current to AC before it leaves the roof.

Microinverters cost a little more than string inverters, but they last longer and offer benefits in terms of safety, efficiency, and flexibility.

Safe

Microinverters convert the DC current to AC on the roof, which means there is no high-voltage DC working its way across your roof to connect to a central inverter. This not only reduces the potential for a fault to spark a fire, it’s also safer for anyone who needs to be on the roof for any reason.

Efficient

All solar panels get obstructed from time to time by leaves, dirt, and clouds. With microinverters, only individual panels are affected, while the unobstructed panels keep performing to their fullest.

A string inverter system is only as good as its lowest-performing panel. If shade or a pile of leaves reduces one panel's output, every other panel will work at the same reduced capacity.

This makes microinverters particularly good for roofs that are shaded for part of the day and ensures you get more solar power and greater energy savings from the same panels.

Flexible 

If you need to expand your system in the future, microinverters are simple to add to your existing solar array one at a time.

To get optimal performance from a string inverter, it needs to be working near its peak capacity. So, if you want to increase the size of your solar array at some point, those panels will need to be routed to a separate string inverter, adding extra complexity and cost.

But wait, there’s more

If something goes wrong with your microinverters, such as an obstruction, crack, or fault, smart monitoring lets us pinpoint the issue instantly, and often resolve it, remotely. If not, we’ll at least arrive at your place knowing exactly what to look for.